Hyper v backup logs

But like most things—some options are better than others. Below are the most common ways Hyper-V users attempt to preserve data on their VMs, with one caveat: Some of these methods should not be relied upon as your sole backup strategy.

But they do serve a purpose, and they can be useful in the right situation. Hyper-V comes with its own administrative tool, called Hyper-V Manager. However, this tool has limitations and, oftentimes, you will have to invest a considerable amount of time and effort into writing backup scripts which you will have to implement yourself.

Essentially, a checkpoint represents the state of a VM at a particular point in time. VMWare calls this same concept a snapshot. For example, in the hours that elapsed between the time you took the checkpoint and the time you need to revert back to it, you may have modified the data—all of which will be lost when you revert back.

You could then save the VM to the local host or network, and import when you need it. Exporting is a viable backup method if nothing else is available. But it comes with limitations. SCVMM allows you to restore whole systems and individual files alike; it can also restore the virtual machine to any available host. Note that the first two options do not offer the ability to cherry-pick individual files for restoring. Because SCVMM lacks a complete feature set around backup process, a restore is still a fairly complex task.

That brings us to option 4. You have more control over how, when and where your backups take place without having to deal with the complexities associated with the manual process. This robust software allows you to:. Using a very expensive backup-only product is usually overkill for most Hyper-V users. Or download a free trial and see for yourself!

Email: sales 5nine. Acronis Acquires 5nine. Create checkpoints. Export the virtual machine.

hyper v backup logs

Restore to an alternate host. Use a third-party backup solution. This robust software allows you to: Backup to Azure. Free up your local storage capacity and maintain business continuity. Perform both full and incremental Hyper-V backups, so you can choose to backup an entire VM or just the information that was changed. Incremental backups help optimize your resources and can be done without any service interruptions. Reduce the size of your Hyper-V backup files.

This saves disc space and decreases recovery time. Schedule your backup jobs. Tailor your recovery time objective RTO and recovery point objective RPO to meet your needs, scheduling backups either by date and time, or periodically for example, every six hours.

Quickly restore Hyper-V VMs. In case of a failure or malfunction, your virtual machine can easily be restored to the same storage location or anywhere else you choose.

Easily manage your backup retention policies.A demonstration video is available on my YouTube channel. The -NoPerms switch is intended as a workaround when used in an environment where the Hyper-V host cannot be given the required permissions to run a regular export to a remote device such as a NAS device.

To copy all the files necessary for a complete backup, the VM must be in an offline state for the operation to be completed, so the VM will be shut down for the duration of the copy process when the -NoPerms switch is used.

I recommend setting up a staggered Scheduled Task to run the script on each of the Hyper-V hosts in the cluster. The password used for SMTP server authentication must be in an encrypted text file. To generate the password file, run the following command in PowerShell on the computer and logged in with the user that will be running the utility.

When you run the command, you will be prompted for a username and password. Enter the username and password you want to use to authenticate to your SMTP server.

Please note: This is only required if you need to authenticate to the SMTP server when send the log via e-mail. After running the commands, you will have a text file containing the encrypted password. When configuring the -Pwd switch enter the path and file name of this file. The table below shows all the command line options available with descriptions and example configurations. Any backups older than 30 days will also be deleted in the backup location. Like Like. Ok, thanks.

For me, I added the -noperms switch because my Hyper-V server is a member of a domain and I wanted to export the VMs to a NAS device which was not running a Windows OS, and so could not grant the permissions needed for the proper export function to work.

hyper v backup logs

Or just explicitly name them when running the script. Can I assume from the script the previously exported VM is deleted before the next export for that particular VM name?

I like the idea of exporting to another VM host. Ex portVMCommand. Like Liked by 1 person.One of the various concerns of a Hyper-V administrator is troubleshooting the Hyper-V environment when problems arise. Common troubleshooting for Hyper-V environments may involve investigating issues around attached storage, networking issues, or perhaps performance issues that may exist in the environment. Whatever the issue may be, Hyper-V administrators must utilize troubleshooting tools available to be able to identify the issue or at least start looking in the right direction for the cause of the issue.

One of the powerful troubleshooting tools at the disposal of the Hyper-V administrator is the Hyper-V event log. The event logs in Windows Server has typically not received the most welcomed reaction from administrators.

hyper v backup logs

Typically, most administrators do not like scouring through log entries trying to find the source of the issue. However, with Windows Server hosting Hyper-V, Microsoft has done a much better job of specifically capturing Hyper-V events and organizing the Hyper-V specific logs in such a way that they make sense and are much more intuitive. There are 11 different log files that are used to capture Hyper-V information in typical event viewer fashion, albeit in a much more useful manner.

Windows Server contains the following log file groupings to help with troubleshooting Hyper-V environments:. Hyper-V specific event viewer logs useful in troubleshooting. Even though Microsoft has organized the event viewer groups into fairly logical and intuitive channels, some may desire to take the event viewer a step further in the direction of consolidating all the logs into a single view for more easily piecing together issues or troubleshooting an underlying problem.

Switching between the different logs may be a bit cumbersome, especially if more than one Hyper-V component is at play in the issue or various parts of the overall problem picture are found in different logs.

There is a GitHub PowerShell module that can be downloaded that allows enabling all the important Windows event channels into a single evtx file to help with troubleshooting.

There are a couple of steps to take advantage of the PowerShell module from GitHub.

An Overview of Hyper-V Event Logs

First, you need to download and import the PowerShell module, then you reproduce the issue which should capture the relevant information in the logs. Disable the analytical and operational logs — by default admin logs are left enabled. When using System Center Virtual Machine Manager with the central point of management for Hyper-V, administrators have the ability to have a single pane of glass look at multiple Hyper-V hosts.

Taking it a step further, the Details tab of the Jobs view provides a step-by-step overview of the action and any sub-component part of a task that failed. Below, a failure to create virtual machine task shows the status of Failed.

What caused the job to fail? The Details view allows digging further. Looking at Recent Jobs tasks. This is extremely helpful when you are looking to detail exactly what is causing a global task to fail. Troubleshooting Windows Server Hyper-V environments can be intimidating at first glance with the various tools, management interfaces, and complex implementations that may be provisioned in certain environments.

The Event Viewer on a Hyper-V host contains valuable information regarding the various major components that make up the Hyper-V infrastructure. These are separated out into a folder in the Windows Event Viewer Applications and Services node under the Windows parent group.

With each of the major Hyper-V components being logged, administrators can pinpoint the nature of a specific Hyper-V error. However, if administrators want a consolidated view, this can be accomplished with the GitHub PowerShell function that is readily available for download. For a default consolidated and intuitive view of Hyper-V errors, System Center Virtual Machine Manager provides a centralized view of all Hyper-V hosts and clusters and allows a granular look at specific task failures and can even show the step on which a specific task failed.

SCVMM is certainly recommended in larger Hyper-V deployments with several hosts and multiple clusters as it can consolidate and streamline troubleshooting time and effort due to the centralized management plan. Follow our Twitter and Facebook feeds for new releases, updates, insightful posts and more.

Toggle SlidingBar Area. Previous Next.In addition to logs stored on the backup server, log files are also stored on all servers added to the backup infrastructure:. You can change default log files settings. For more information, see this Veeam KB article. Our website uses cookies!

By continuing to use our website, you agree with our use of cookies in accordance with our Cookie Policy. You can reject cookies by changing your browser settings. Start Setup Wizard Step 2.

Read and Accept License Agreement Step 3. Provide License File Step 4. Install Missing Software Step 6. Specify Installation Settings Step 7. Specify Service Account Settings Step 8. Specify Service Ports Step Specify Data Locations Step Begin Installation Step Install Missing Software Step 4. Specify Installation Settings Step 5. Specify Installation Path Step 6. Specify Server Name or Address Step 3. Choose Server Type Step 4.

Specify Credentials Step 5. Review Components Step 6. Finish Working with Wizard Step 7. Specify Server Type Step 4. Specify Credentials Step 4. Review Components Step 5. Choose Server Step 3. Configure Traffic Rules Step 4. Specify Object Storage Name Step 3. Specify Object Storage Account Step 4. Specify Object Storage Settings Step 5.

Specify Object Storage Name Step 2. Specify Object Storage Account Step 3. Specify Object Storage Settings Step 4. Launch Import Wizard Step 2.You can back data up at the Hyper-V host level to enable VM-level and file-level data recovery, or back up at the guest-level to enable application-level recovery.

Virtual machines with local or direct storage - Back up virtual machines hosted on Hyper-V host standalone servers that have local or directly attached storage. The DPM protection agent must be installed on all hosts. The DPM protection agent is installed on each cluster node. SMB shares are supported on a standalone file server or on a file server cluster. If you're using an external SMB 3.

If the storage server is clustered, the agent should be installed on each cluster node. Back up virtual machines configured for live migration - Live migration allows you to move virtual machines from one location to while providing uniterrupted access. You can migrate virtual machines between two standalone servers, within a single cluster, or between standalone and cluster nodes.

Multiple live migrations can run concurrently. You can also perform a live migration of virtual machine storage so that virtual machines can be moved to new storage locations while they continue to run.

DPM can back up virtual machines that are configured for live migration. Read more. Back up replica virtual machines - Back up replica virtual machines running on a secondary server DPM R2 only. At the host level the DPM protection agent is installed on the Hyper-V host server or cluster and protects the entire VMs and data files running on that host. At the guest level the agent is installed on each virtual machine and protects the workload present on that machine.

Host-level backups are flexible because they work regardless of the type of OS running on the guest machines and don't require the installation of the DPM protection agent on each VM. If you deploy host level back you'll be able to recover an entire virtual machine, or files and folders item-level recovery. Guest-level back is useful if you want to protect specific workloads running on a virtual machine. At host-level you can recover an entire VM or specific files, but it won't provide recover in the context of a specific application.

For example to be able to recover specific SharePoint items from a backed up VM then you should do guest-level backup of that VM.There is a lot that can happen to your Hyper-V server and fortunately most of these events, both good and bad, are recorded in the Windows event log. But monitoring these events can be a tedious process, especially if you rely on manual processes. This is a perfect situation where automation via Windows PowerShell can make your life much easier and help keep an eye on the health of your Hyper-V servers.

In PowerShell there are two cmdlets you can use. Get-Eventlog will query the classic event logs like System, Security and Application. The System event log is a great thing to check for operating system and other general issues. In addition to the System event log, you might also find Hyper-V related errors in the Application event log. Any entries should belong to one of these sources:. Once you know this, you can modify your Get-Eventlog command to search the Application event log for any entries connected to these sources using a wildcard.

What can you do with this? How about sending yourself an email every morning of the most recent errors and warnings on your Hyper-V servers? Be sure to read help on Send-MailMessage to see how to use it.

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I already have a global variable for the mail server. The script gets all the Hyper-V related errors and warnings from the System and Application logs on the 2 systems in my network running Hyper-V. It only gets events that have been recorded since midnight of the previous day. If I run this first thing in the morning, in essence I get a report in my inbox of all errors and warnings from the last day or so. This script should run on any system running PowerShell 2. But if you are running PowerShell 3.

There is another part to the Hyper-V event log story. Windows includes a large number of diagnostic and operational logs. Many of them are created based on server roles or features. You can see them in the Event Viewer. If you scroll down you should see some Hyper-V related entries. These logs too will have errors and warnings. The Get-EventLog cmdlet only works with the legacy logs like System.

While you could query each log individually, we can easily search with wildcards and a hash table of filtering values. These logs are formatted as XML files so searching them is super speedy.

If there were no records found, PowerShell will throw an exception which you can safely ignore. On my server, I had to go back 30 days to find some errors to display.

Because this is something you will presumably want to do frequently, allow me to turn this into a PowerShell function. Obviously this is much more complicated than the simple command I started with. When I wrote this I had two requirements. First, I wanted to be able to use alternate credentials and I wanted to resolve the user SID that is in the event log entry. So yes, it looks like a lot, but this is all it takes to use it:.

I like using Out-Gridview but you can do whatever you want with the event log information, which is the entire point. Download a day trial and get started in under 15 minutes.There is a lot that can happen to your Hyper-V server and fortunately most of these events, both good and bad, are recorded in the Windows event log.

But monitoring these events can be a tedious process, especially if you rely on manual processes. This is a perfect situation where automation via Windows PowerShell can make your life much easier and help keep an eye on the health of your Hyper-V servers.

In PowerShell there are two cmdlets you can use. Get-Eventlog will query the classic event logs like System, Security and Application.

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The System event log is a great thing to check for operating system and other general issues. In addition to the System event log, you might also find Hyper-V related errors in the Application event log.

Any entries should belong to one of these sources:. Once you know this, you can modify your Get-Eventlog command to search the Application event log for any entries connected to these sources using a wildcard.

What can you do with this? How about sending yourself an email every morning of the most recent errors and warnings on your Hyper-V servers?

Be sure to read help on Send-MailMessage to see how to use it. I already have a global variable for the mail server. The script gets all the Hyper-V related errors and warnings from the System and Application logs on the 2 systems in my network running Hyper-V. It only gets events that have been recorded since midnight of the previous day. If I run this first thing in the morning, in essence I get a report in my inbox of all errors and warnings from the last day or so.

This script should run on any system running PowerShell 2. But if you are running PowerShell 3. There is another part to the Hyper-V event log story.

Windows includes a large number of diagnostic and operational logs. Many of them are created based on server roles or features. You can see them in the Event Viewer.

If you scroll down you should see some Hyper-V related entries. These logs too will have errors and warnings. The Get-EventLog cmdlet only works with the legacy logs like System. While you could query each log individually, we can easily search with wildcards and a hash table of filtering values.

These logs are formatted as XML files so searching them is super speedy. If there were no records found, PowerShell will throw an exception which you can safely ignore.

hyper v backup logs

On my server, I had to go back 30 days to find some errors to display. Because this is something you will presumably want to do frequently, allow me to turn this into a PowerShell function. Obviously this is much more complicated than the simple command I started with. When I wrote this I had two requirements. First, I wanted to be able to use alternate credentials and I wanted to resolve the user SID that is in the event log entry.

So yes, it looks like a lot, but this is all it takes to use it:. I like using Out-Gridview but you can do whatever you want with the event log information, which is the entire point.

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